The Narratives of History in “Killadelphia”: Part III

Writing to John Wayles Eppes in 1820, Thomas Jefferson spoke about about the exploitation of those he enslaved, especially in relation to the profits that he acquired off of the backs of their labor. He told Eppes, “I know no error more consuming to an estate that that of stocking farms with men almost exclusively. I consider a woman who brings a child every two years as more profitable than the…

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Here, you will find reflections on African American, American, and Southern Literature, American popular culture and politics, and pedagogy.

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Matthew Teutsch

Matthew Teutsch

Here, you will find reflections on African American, American, and Southern Literature, American popular culture and politics, and pedagogy.